What is difference between User space and Kernel space?

  • Is Kernel space used when Kernel is executing on the behalf of the user program i.e. System Call? Or is it the address space for all the Kernel threads (for example scheduler)?

    If it is the first one, than does it mean that normal user program cannot have more than 3GB of memory (if the division is 3GB + 1GB)? Also, in that case how can kernel use High Memory, because to what virtual memory address will the pages from high memory be mapped to, as 1GB of kernel space will be logically mapped?

  • Is Kernel space used when Kernel is executing on the behalf of the user program i.e. System Call? Or is it the address space for all the Kernel threads (for example scheduler)?

    Yes and yes.

    Before we go any further, we should state this about memory.

    Memory get's divided into two distinct areas:

    • The user space, which is a set of locations where normal user processes run (i.e everything other than the kernel). The role of the kernel is to manage applications running in this space from messing with each other, and the machine.
    • The kernel space, which is the location where the code of the kernel is stored, and executes under.

    Processes running under the user space have access only to a limited part of memory, whereas the kernel has access to all of the memory. Processes running in user space also don't have access to the kernel space. User space processes can only access a small part of the kernel via an interface exposed by the kernel - the system calls. If a process performs a system call, a software interrupt is sent to the kernel, which then dispatches the appropriate interrupt handler and continues its work after the handler has finished.

    Kernel space code has the property to run in "kernel mode", which (in your typical desktop -x86- computer) is what you call code that executes under ring 0. Typically in x86 architecture, there are 4 rings of protection. Ring 0 (kernel mode), Ring 1 (may be used by virtual machine hypervisors or drivers), Ring 2 (may be used by drivers, I am not so sure about that though). Ring 3 is what typical applications run under. It is the least privileged ring, and applications running on it have access to a subset of the processor's instructions. Ring 0 (kernel space) is the most privileged ring, and has access to all of the machine's instructions. For example to this, a "plain" application (like a browser) can not use x86 assembly instructions lgdt to load the global descriptor table or hlt to halt a processor.

    If it is the first one, than does it mean that normal user program cannot have more than 3GB of memory (if the division is 3GB + 1GB)? Also, in that case how can kernel use High Memory, because to what virtual memory address will the pages from high memory be mapped to, as 1GB of kernel space will be logically mapped?

    For an answer to this, please refer to the excellent answer by wag here

    Don't hesitate to tell me if I have made a mistake somewhere. I am new to kernel programming, and I dumped here what I have learned so far, along with some other information I found around the web. Which means that there may be deficiencies in my understanding of concepts that may be demonstrated in the text.

    Thanks! I think now I understand it better. Just to make sure that I get it correctly, I have one more question. Again considering that the first 3GB are used for userspace and 128MB of kernel space is used for High memory, is the remaining 896MB (Low Memory) statically mapped at boot-time?

    @NlightNFotis I say that almost 15 people believe that whatever have you said, is correct (or so you makes us think ;))

    I thought x86 ring `-1` was for hypervisors? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protection_ring

    Note the difference between virtual memory and physical memory. Most of what you ask about is about virtual memory. This is mapped to physical memory, this gets complicated as physical memory approaches 3GB, and PAE is used. It then gets simple again when a 64bit kernel is used, in this case negative addresses are reserved for kernel, and positive ones for user space. 32bit processes can now use 4GB of virtual space. 64bit processes can use a lot more — typically 48 bits worth (at this time on x86-64).

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Content dated before 6/26/2020 9:53 AM